Books

Books By Regional Indian Writers That Have Not Been Lost In Translation

By  | 

A book can be a great companion on a long journey, a lazy day or a sleepless night and with a country as diverse as ours, it’s no surprise that there are thousands of stories from every language, place and culture, but sadly, we hardly hear about them, let alone read them. But, translated Indian literature offers us a wide variety of stories set in different times, featuring unique people and retold by authors who are famous in their own right. There is a plethora of emotion that you can relate to, stories that resonate with you, and characters that make you see the world anew.

Here is a list of regional literature that have not been lost in translation.

Written in Tears by Arupa Patangia Kalita (Assamese)

Amazon

This collection of short stories reveals the threads of life of those inside a bus set on fire and of those outside it.  Exploring socio-political strife in Assam and neighboring provinces, the book’s characters are immensely real and their stories not only important, but also stirring. Arupa Kalita Patangia is not only one of Assam’s foremost women writers but one of India’s leading feminist writers who was awarded the Sahitya Akademi Award in 2014. Written In Tears will educate you, move you and take you on a journey unlike any other.

Buy Here!

Godan by Munshi Premchand (Hindi)

Pinterest

Godan is a Hindi novel by Munshi Premchand, translated into English as The Gift of a Cow. It is an epic novel that explores class based culture and rural poverty as well as exploitation, love, brotherhood and marriage in a well-woven tale of a peasant family that tugs at the heartstrings. Though it was first published in 1936, Godan’s relevance to Indian society today and its sheer pathos are hard to ignore.

Buy Here!

Those Days by Sunil Gangopadhyay (Bengali)

Goodreads

Known in the original Bengali as Sei Samay, Those Days is set in the 19th century and spins a tale around the 1857 revolt, the Bengal Renaissance and two wealthy families whose lives are interwoven. Combining romance, history and nationalism, this is one novel that truly captures the period it was set in. This skillful translation by Aruna Chakravarti gives us the essence of the author’s original text perfectly.

Buy Here!

Cobalt Blue by Sachin Kundalkar (Marathi)

Goodreads

A stranger’s arrival sends a traditional Marathi household into a tizzy. When both brother and sister fall in love with him — truly and irrevocably — what follows in the wake of the stranger leaving is what Cobalt Blue is about. Framing the narrative from two perspectives, author Sachin Kundalkar forges a powerful dialogue about gender, sexuality and family dynamics in this novel. Jerry Pinto’s translation, of course, captures the author’s sentiments beautifully, and is a must-read.

Buy Here!

In a Forest, a Deer by Ambai (Tamil)

Women’s Web

Translated from Tamil by Lakshmi Holmstrom, this collection of short stories by Ambai (the pen-name of C.S. Lakshmi) is as powerful as it is gentle. Ambai’s stories typically are typically centered around women and have strong feminist undertones, and this collection is no different. From the wonder of childhood discoveries to the pain that comes with being an adult alone in a foreign place, a range of emotions and situations are covered in her short stories.

Buy Here!

Hangwoman by K R Meera (Malayalam)

Amazon

An unforgettable story about a woman, ordinary in some ways and extraordinary in others, Hangwoman (or Aarachaar in its original) is one of the most evocative books in modern Malayalam literature, having sold more than 83,000 copies. Based on a family of executioners, it tells the tale of a woman struggling to do what she does and be who she is. At its heart, the book is about live execution and the impact of media in the world today.

Buy Here!

The Revenue Stamp by Amrita Pritam (Punjabi)

Goodreads

It is sacrilege to talk of Indian literature without mentioning the name of Amrita Pritam, the first woman to win the Sahitya Akademi Award. A writer to reckon with, she was a feminist in the true sense of the word — living life on her own terms, regardless of cultural or societal expectations. Although her book Pinjar won her great acclaim, her autobiography, Revenue Stamp (Rasidi Ticket) tells a fascinating story of an author who witnessed defining moments in Indian history. From leaving her husband to be with Imroz to her feelings for poet and lyricist Sahir Ludhianvi, this autobiography is a must-read for a captivating slice of life.

Buy Here!

So, which book are you going to add to your reading list? Tell us in the comment section below.

Thanks to Flipkart.com and Polkacafe.com

Comments

comments